Michhu

1. Can you tell me a little about yourself?

.  Don’t provide your full employment or personal history.

. Offer 2-3 specific experiences that you feel are most valuable and relevant .

. Conclude with how these experiences have made you perfect for this specific role .

The last section of your CV should contain the following personal data:

.
 Date of birth

Sex and marital status

.
 Nationality

.
 Language

Example:

Personal data
.
Date of birth 25 May 1981

.
 Sex and marital status Single women

.
 Nationality Indian

.
 Languages ​​known English, Hindi, Tamil, French



Tips

• Keep your CV file names short, simple and informative.

.

Make sure your resume is clean and free of typos.

.
 Always create your resume on plain white paper.


Interview FAQs

Check out some of the most common interview questions and helpful tips for answering them
.


1.
Can you tell me a bit about yourself?

Reply prompt:

.
 Do not provide your full employment or personal background.

.
 Suggest 2-3 specific experiences that you find most valuable and relevant.
.Conclude by summarizing how these experiences have prepared you well for this particular role.




2. How did you hear about this position?

Reply prompt:

.

Tell the interviewer how you heard about the job – whether through a friend (name a friend), an event or article (name it), or a job portal. job (name which one).

.
 Explain what excites you about the job and how this role particularly grabs your attention.

3. What do you know about the company?
Response prompt:

.
 Don’t memorize a company’s About Us page.

.
 Show that you understand and care about company goals.

.

Explain why you believe in the company’s mission and values.

4. Why do you want this job?

Answer Tip:

shows that you are passionate about the job.

Identify why this position is suitable for you.
Explain why you like this company.


5. Why should we hire you?

.
 Answer the prompt on

.

Use your words to prove that you are not only qualified for the job, but that you will achieve great results

. Explain why you would be a perfect fit with the team and work culture.

.
 Explain why you should be selected over any other candidate

6. What is your greatest professional strength?
Response prompt:

.
 Be honest  share some of your real strengths instead of giving answers you think are good.

.
 Provide examples of specific strengths relevant to the position you are applying for.

 Give examples of how you have demonstrated these strengths.
7. What do you think are your weaknesses?

Answer Prompt:

.
 The purpose of this question is to assess your self-awareness and honesty.

• Give an example of a quality you struggle with but try to improve.
8. What is your salary requirement?

Response Tip:

• Do your research ahead of time to find out the typical salary range for the position you are applying for.

.
 Determine your place on the salary scale based on your experience, training and skills.
.Workaround. Tell the interviewer that you know your skills are valuable, but you want the job and are willing to negotiate.

9 What do you like to do outside of work?

Reply prompt:

.

The purpose of this question is to see if you are a good fit with the company culture.

.
 Be honest and open about activities and hobbies that interest and excite you

10. If you were an animal, what would you want to be?

Reply prompt:

.

The purpose of this question is to see if you can think

independently. There are no wrong answers, but to make a good impression, try to highlight your strengths or personality traits through your answers.

11. What do you think we could do better or differently?

Answer Technique

• The purpose of this question is to verify that you have researched the company and to test your ability to think critically and come up with new ideas.
come up with new ideas. Show how your interests and expertise will help you bring these ideas to life

12. Do you have any questions for us?

Answer Tips:

• Don’t ask questions that are easily answered on the company’s website or by a quick online search.
.Ask intelligent questions that demonstrate your critical thinking skills.

Tip

.
 Be honest and confident when answering.
.

Use examples from your past experiences whenever possible to make your answers more impactful.

Preparation for work – Terminology and glossary

Every employee must know the following terms:

Annual leave: Paid leave granted by an employer to an employee.

Background check: The method used by employers to verify the accuracy of information provided by
potential candidates.

Benefits: Part of an employee’s compensation.

Breaks: Short breaks during working hours for employees.
Total compensation: The combination of salary and benefits offered to him by the employer.

Contract employee: An employee who works for an organization that sells its services to another company on a project or time basis.

Contract of Employment: A contract of employment exists when an employee is offered work in exchange for wages or salary and accepts an offer from an employer.

.
 Company culture: Beliefs and values ​​shared by all members of the company and transmitted from one generation of employees to the next
Cover letter: A letter to attach to a candidate’s CV. It highlights the key points of the
candidate’s CV and provides concrete examples to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to fulfill the intended role.

Curriculum Vitae (CV)/CV: A summary of an applicant’s accomplishments, education, work experience, skills and strengths.

Rejection letter: A letter sent by an employee to an employer refusing an offer of employment from the employer to the employee.

Deductions: Amounts that are deducted from an employee’s pay and appear on the employee’s payroll.
Discrimination: The act of treating one person less favorably than another.

Employee: A person who works for another person in exchange for remuneration.

Employee training: Seminars or internal training that employees are required to attend by their superiors for the benefit of the employer.

Employment gap: hours of unemployment between jobs.

Fixed-term contract: Employment contract ending on an agreed date.
Follow-up: action of a candidate contacting a potential employer after submitting a resume.

• Freelancer/Consultant/Independent Contractor: A person who works on their own account and represents temporary work and projects for various employers.

Vacation: Paid vacation.

Hourly wage: The amount of wages paid for 60 minutes of work.

• Internship: An employment opportunity offered by an employer to a potential employee (called an intern) to work in the employer’s company for a specified and limited period of time.
Interview: A conversation between a potential employee and an employer representative to determine whether
should hire the potential employee.

• Job Application: A form requesting information such as a job applicant’s name, address, contact details and work experience. A candidate submits a job application to demonstrate that candidate’s interest in working for a particular company.

Job Offer: A job offer offered by an employer to a potential employee.

Job Search Agents: Programs that allow candidates to search for job opportunities by selecting the job offer criteria listed in the program.
Layoff: A layoff occurs when an employee is terminated because the employer has not offered them a job
.


Leave of Absence: Formal authorization given by their employer to an employee to take a leave of absence

Offer of Offer: A letter from the employer to the employee, an acknowledgment from the employer and the terms of the offer.

Letter of Agreement: a letter outlining the terms and conditions of employment

Reference Letter: a letter intended to verify a person’s qualifications for the position

Maternity Leave: leave for women who are pregnant or have recently give birth.

Mentor: A person with a higher level of work than you who advises you and guides you in your
career.

Minimum wage.
The amount of minimum wage paid per hour.

Notice: A notice issued by an employee or employer stating that a contract of employment w
ends on a specified date.

Job Offer: An offer made by an employer to a potential employee containing information about the proposed job, such as start date, salary, working conditions, etc.
Open contract: A contract of employment that lasts until terminated by the employer or employee
Overqualified: A person who is well above the requirements of the job, or who is currently or formerly overpaid
,
 due to too many years of service or a level of education unsuitable for a particular job.
Part-Time Employees: Employees who work less than the normal
normal hours.
Paternity leave: Leave granted to men who have recently become fathers.

Recruiters/Headhunters/Executive Search Firms: Professionals
professionals
 paid by employers to find people for specific positions.


Resignation/Resignation: When an employee formally notifies his employer that he is leaving his job.

Self-Employed: A person who owns their own business and does not work as an employee.

Timesheet: A form an employee submits to an employer that contains the number of hours the employee worked each day.
.



































Understanding Entrepreneurship

Unit Objectives

At the end of this , you will be able to:

1. Discuss the concept of entrepreneurship

2. Discuss the importance of entrepreneurship

3. Describe the characteristics of an entrepreneur

4.
Describe different types of businesses

5. List the characteristics of effective leaders 6. Discuss the benefits of effective leadership

7. List the characteristics of effective teams

8. Discuss the importance of effective listening
9
.

Discuss how to listen effectively

10. Discuss the importance of speaking effectively

11. Discuss how to speak effectively

12. Discuss how to solve problems

13. List 4 characteristics important problem-solving skills 4 14.4.
Discuss ways to assess problem solving

15. Discuss the importance of negotiation

16. Discuss how to negotiate

17. Discuss how to identify new business opportunities

44 s How to identify 4 Opportunities 4 4 4 Identify. 19.
Understand what it means to be an entrepreneur

20. Describe different types of entrepreneurs

21. List the characteristics of an entrepreneur

22. Recall entrepreneurial success stories

23. Discuss the entrepreneurial process 444
.

Describe the entrepreneurial ecosystem

25. Discuss the role of government in the entrepreneurial ecosystem

26. Discuss the current entrepreneurial ecosystem in India

27. Understand the purpose of the make in India movement
4428- Relationship between entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship. Risk appetite

29.
Discuss the relationship between entrepreneurship and resilience

30. Describe the characteristics of a resilient entrepreneur

31. Discuss how to deal with failure



Concept Introduction
Anyone who is determined to start a business, no matter what the risk, is an entrepreneur Entrepreneurs run their own startups, take financial risks, and use creativity, innovation, and a large pool of self-motivation to succeed. They dream big and are determined to turn their ideas into viable products at all costs.
The goal of an entrepreneur is to start a business. The process of creating this business is called entrepreneurship.

The importance of entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship is important for the following reasons:

1. It leads to the creation of new organizations

2. It brings creativity to the market
344.
It leads to an increase in the standard of living

Contributes to the development of a country’s economy

Characteristics of entrepreneurs
All successful entrepreneurs have certain characteristics in common.
They are both

Passionate about their work

Confident

Disciplined and dedicated


Be motivated and drive

.
 Very creative

.
 Visionary

• Open-minded

.
 Decisive

Entrepreneurs are also inclined:

. Have a high risk tolerance

.

Plan everything carefully

. Manage their money wisely

.
 Put customers first

.
 Learn about their offer and market on

.
 Seek expert advice if needed on

.

Know when to stop your losses


Examples of famous entrepreneurs

Famous entrepreneurs are:

Bill Gates (founder of Microsoft)

Steve Jobs (co-founder of Apple)

Mark Zach Berg Facebook round)

.
 Pierre Omidyar (founder of ea

Types of businesses

As an entrepreneur in India, you can own and manage any of the following types of businesses

Sole Proprietorship

In Sole Proprietorship , one person controls and manages the business.
This type of business is the easiest to set up in terms of legal formalities. There is no separate legal existence for the business and the owner. All profits belong to the owner and all losses are the unlimited liability of the contractor.

Partnership

A partnership is formed by two or more persons. The owners of a business are called partners.
The partnership deed must be signed by all the partners. The firm and its partners do not have a distinct legal existence. The profits are shared by the partners. The liability of the partner in the event of loss is unlimited. The life of the company is limited and in the event of death, retirement, bankruptcy or insanity of one of the partners, the company must be dissolved

Limited Liability Company (LLP)

In a company with Limited Liability or LLP, partners have the rights and benefits of limited liability. Each partner’s capacity is limited to the contributions he agrees to make to the LLP.
A partnership and its partners have a separate legal existence.

invites

.
 Learning from other failures

Make sure that’s what you want.

.

Look for problems to solve, not problems related to your ideas.

Leadership and Teamwork: Leadership and Leaders

Leadership means setting an example for others. Leading by example means asking someone to do something you wouldn’t want to do yourself. Leadership is about figuring out what it takes to win for your team and your business.

Leaders believe in doing the right thing.
They also believe in helping others do the right thing. Valid
leaders are:

Create an inspiring vision of the future.
.
 Motivate and motivate his team to pursue this vision.